Ed DunhamAdministrator
(Former Meteorologist & CFHC Forum Moderator (Ed Passed Away on May 14, 2017))
Sat Aug 06 2011 11:15 PM
Hurricane Stuff

This year has started with 5 straight Tropical Storms. 2002 (12/4/2) started with 6 straight Tropical Storms. 2006 (10/5/2) started with 5 straight Tropical Storms and ended with 5 straight Hurricanes.
ED


Ed DunhamAdministrator
(Former Meteorologist & CFHC Forum Moderator (Ed Passed Away on May 14, 2017))
Sat Aug 06 2011 11:26 PM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

Here is one that is quite difficult:
There have been 5 named Hurricanes that have hit the United States (landfall) as a Major Hurricane, but their names were not retired. Name the five. A (useless) hint: Four of the names are no longer in use. There is probably only a couple of folks on the site that might come up with the correct answer - its a tough one.
Good Luck!
ED


Ed DunhamAdministrator
(Former Meteorologist & CFHC Forum Moderator (Ed Passed Away on May 14, 2017))
Sun Aug 07 2011 02:32 PM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

While you ponder the tough one above, here is an easy one:

Hurricane Andrew hit the United States as a Major Hurricane in 1992 - twice! One other named hurricane has hit the U.S. twice as a Major. Which one, and when?
ED


Hurricane29
(Weather Guru)
Tue Aug 09 2011 08:21 AM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

Quote:

Here is one that is quite difficult:
There have been 5 named Hurricanes that have hit the United States (landfall) as a Major Hurricane, but their names were not retired. Name the five. A (useless) hint: Four of the names are no longer in use. There is probably only a couple of folks on the site that might come up with the correct answer - its a tough one.
Good Luck!
ED




That's a tough question that would take some time to research...The first name that comes to mind is H. Bret in 1999, which hit very sparsely populated Kenedy County, TX as a 100-kt major hurricane. Usually such storms would have occurred in remote areas like central LA, S. TX, the NC Outer Banks, and maybe the FL Big Bend areas since there is little population there.


Ed DunhamAdministrator
(Former Meteorologist & CFHC Forum Moderator (Ed Passed Away on May 14, 2017))
Tue Aug 09 2011 12:34 PM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

You've got the easy one - only 4 more to go!
ED


danielwAdministrator
(Moderator)
Tue Aug 09 2011 03:32 PM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

While researching ED's question. I came across the following Category 4 and 5 Major hurricanes that are still on the rotating list of active names. Interesting.


Name; Season; Month; Max. sustained winds(Knots) (km/h) (mph); Minimum pressure(mbar)


Hurricane Helene 1958 September 115 215 130 934
Hurricane Harvey 1981 September 115 215 130 946
Hurricane Debby 1982 September 115 215 130 950
Hurricane Gabrielle 1989 August, September 125 230 145 927
Hurricane Claudette 1991 September 115 215 130 946
Hurricane Edouard 1996 August, September 125 230 145 933
Hurricane Bret 1999 August 125 230 145 944
Hurricane Cindy 1999 August 120 220 140 942
Hurricane Gert 1999 September 130 240 150 930
Hurricane Isaac 2000 September, October 120 220 144 943
Hurricane Omar 2008 October 115 230 135 958
Hurricane Bill 2009 August 115 230 135 943
Hurricane Danielle 2010 August 115 215 135 942
Hurricane Earl 2010 August, September 125 230 145 928
Hurricane Julia 2010 September 120 215 140 948
*********************************************
Cat 5
Hurricane Emily 2005 July 160mph 260km/h 929mb

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutnames.shtml#atl

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Atlantic_hurricanes


Ed DunhamAdministrator
(Former Meteorologist & CFHC Forum Moderator (Ed Passed Away on May 14, 2017))
Sat Aug 13 2011 07:41 PM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

In the Atlantic basin, storm names starting with the letter 'C' have been retired 9 times - 8 times for the letters 'F' and 'I'.
ED


Ed DunhamAdministrator
(Former Meteorologist & CFHC Forum Moderator (Ed Passed Away on May 14, 2017))
Sun Aug 14 2011 10:27 PM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

Question: How many seasons have started with 7 tropical storms or had 7 tropical storms in a row at some point during the season?

Answer: If Gert does not reach hurricane intensity, only 2011 can make that claim, i.e., its a record.

The 2002 season started with 6 straight tropical storms and 1942 had 6 tropical storms in a row during the season.
ED


MichaelA
(Weather Analyst)
Mon Aug 15 2011 08:08 PM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

It certainly appears that this season has been a bit odd. I wonder what will happen for the rest of it.

ernurse
(Registered User)
Thu Aug 18 2011 10:21 PM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

I believe that would be Hurricane Betsy in 1965 - lived in Homestead at the time, so remember it well.

Ed DunhamAdministrator
(Former Meteorologist & CFHC Forum Moderator (Ed Passed Away on May 14, 2017))
Thu Aug 18 2011 10:38 PM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

Indeed it was Betsy - hit south Florida on 9/8/65 as a Cat III and eastern Louisiana on 9/10/65 as a Cat IV.
ED


Ed DunhamAdministrator
(Former Meteorologist & CFHC Forum Moderator (Ed Passed Away on May 14, 2017))
Mon Jul 09 2012 11:28 PM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

Haven't done these in awhile so while it is quiet, here is another one:

There was a season where the same name was used for two different storms. What was the name and what was the year?
ED


Ed DunhamAdministrator
(Former Meteorologist & CFHC Forum Moderator (Ed Passed Away on May 14, 2017))
Tue Jul 10 2012 12:01 AM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

Since the one posted above is rather easy, here is a tougher one:

Since the start of the weather satellite era, there have been four seasons where two hurricanes had their entire tropical cyclone track in the Gulf of Mexico prior to landfall. What were the seasons and the associated hurricane names?
ED


Ed DunhamAdministrator
(Former Meteorologist & CFHC Forum Moderator (Ed Passed Away on May 14, 2017))
Tue Jul 10 2012 12:32 AM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

This one is quite unusual:
There was a season that had two 'A' storms, two 'C' storms and two 'D' storms - what was the year?
ED


LoisCane
(Veteran Storm Chaser)
Tue Jul 10 2012 09:19 PM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

Barbara 54, 55? Was that the answer for name in two years? I think it's a trick question.

What I do notice here is how many Cs were retired over time... that were late storms..not June, not July.

As much as we say the Hurricane Season starts June 1st it's like Pre-Season Football... doesn't really start til the real season starts.



Ed DunhamAdministrator
(Former Meteorologist & CFHC Forum Moderator (Ed Passed Away on May 14, 2017))
Wed Jul 11 2012 12:16 AM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

I think that you misunderstood the question - the same name was used twice in the same year.
ED


Ed DunhamAdministrator
(Former Meteorologist & CFHC Forum Moderator (Ed Passed Away on May 14, 2017))
Thu Oct 25 2012 09:21 PM
Re: Hurricane Stuff - STC Sandy?

Hurricane Sandy has the potential to become a significant subtropical cyclone that could threaten the Northeast early next week. First, some definitions from NHC:

Hurricane / Typhoon:
A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind (using the U.S. 1-minute average) is 64 kt (74 mph or 119 km/hr) or more. The term hurricane is used for Northern Hemisphere tropical cyclones east of the International Dateline to the Greenwich Meridian. The term typhoon is used for Pacific tropical cyclones north of the Equator west of the International Dateline.

Subtropical Cyclone:
A non-frontal low-pressure system that has characteristics of both tropical and extratropical cyclones. Like tropical cyclones, they are non-frontal, synoptic-scale cyclones that originate over tropical or subtropical waters, and have a closed surface wind circulation about a well-defined center. In addition, they have organized moderate to deep convection, but lack a central dense overcast. Unlike tropical cyclones, subtropical cyclones derive a significant proportion of their energy from baroclinic sources, and are generally cold-core in the upper troposphere, often being associated with an upper-level low or trough. In comparison to tropical cyclones, these systems generally have a radius of maximum winds occurring relatively far from the center (usually greater than 60 n mi), and generally have a less symmetric wind field and distribution of convection.

Subtropical Depression:
A subtropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind speed (using the U.S. 1-minute average) is 33 kt (38 mph or 62 km/hr) or less.

Subtropical Storm:
A subtropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind speed (using the U.S. 1-minute average) is 34 kt (39 mph or 63 km/hr) or more.

Okay - so here is the question: "What do you call a Subtropical Storm that has sustained winds in excess of 64 knots?"

Answer: "Its still a Subtropical Storm." Go back to the definition of a Hurricane and note that it starts off with "A tropical cyclone...". Since the definition for a Hurricane requires a full tropical system, a subtropical system with hurricane force winds is still a Subtropical Storm.

The only previous event that I know of was on October 24, 1979, at 1800Z (similar timeframe) when Subtropical Storm 1 had sustained winds of 65 knots. It was never named (they didn't name subtropical storms back then) and still carries the designation of STS1 for 1979.

TWC has proposed an interesting theory this evening that The Perfect Storm of 1991 (Hurricane #8) and the unnamed storm off the Florida east coast (Aug-Sept) in 2011 were a rare hybrid system that consisted of a tropical system at its core surrounded by an extratropical system beyond the core. The suggestion is that Sandy could become another one of these. Who knows - maybe so - at least its some novel thinking outside of the box.
ED


Ed DunhamAdministrator
(Former Meteorologist & CFHC Forum Moderator (Ed Passed Away on May 14, 2017))
Wed Sep 28 2016 10:50 AM
Re: Hurricane Stuff

Tropical Tidbit:
Only one Cape Verde system has produced sustained hurricane force winds in east central Florida in October. On October 6-7,1873, a Cat III Hurricane hit at Captiva Island and crossed the state at 30mph exiting into the Atlantic at Palm Bay - as a Cat II Hurricane.
ED



Note: This is NOT an official page. It is run by weather hobbyists and should not be used as a replacement for official sources. 
CFHC's main servers are currently located at Hostdime.com in Orlando, FL.
Image Server Network thanks to Mike Potts and Amazon Web Services. If you have static file hosting space that allows dns aliasing contact us to help out! Some Maps Provided by:
Great thanks to all who donated and everyone who uses the site as well. Site designed for 800x600+ resolution
When in doubt, take the word of the National Hurricane Center