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Azores #96L fails to complete transition into a Sub-Tropical Storm. Elsewhere, weak low pressure in Caribbean may linger into next week.
Days since last H. Landfall - US: Any 44 (Nate) , Major: 62 (Maria) Florida - Any: 72 (Irma) Major: 72 (Irma)
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General Discussion >> Hurricane Ask/Tell

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57497479
Weather Master


Reged: Sun
Posts: 414
Loc: W. Central Florida
LOWS... How do you tell the difference?
      #2092 - Tue Aug 20 2002 09:04 PM

How do you tell the difference between an upper low and a surface low when looking at the satillite loop? Also, what type of data do you use? Toni

--------------------
TONI


All of us could take a lesson from the weather:
It pays no attention to criticism

My 2003 Hurricane guess 13-9-3


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Ricreig
User


Reged: Sat
Posts: 431
Loc: Orlando, Fl 28.56N 81.27W
Re: LOWS... How do you tell the difference?
      #2102 - Wed Aug 21 2002 01:22 PM

In reply to:

How do you tell the difference between an upper low and a surface low when looking at the satillite loop? Also, what type of data do you use? Toni




'Tis hard to tell sometimes, but I'll try. Using the satellite, it helps to look at the visible presentation. Often, even usually, a Low Level low will cause the clouds you can see rotating around the low being occasionally obscured by the higher level clouds which are often moving in an entirely different direction. If the visible clouds are movining in the same direction as the IR clouds, it *may* be an upper level low, but of course, storms originating from the surface can and do reach up and have colder tops which rotate. Again, the visible satellite is often the best view...if the rotating clouds are not obscured, they probably are higer and therefore associated with an UL low. Obviously, a large storm can confuse the picture, but the question was regarding 'ordinary' lows. Satellite views are not always good enough (might not be 2 layers of clouds to watch), so where possible, you want surface (buoys, ships, etc) data which tell you the pressure at SL. Even wind direction at SL is a clue as it is more ore less at right angles to the direction of the low/high causing the wind. If the winds and pressures suggest a low at the surface, and it agrees with your observations of the satellite pics, you have confirmed that it is a Low Level low you are seeing.

I am sure there are other ways to determine this (ask the professionals who frequent here ) but this is how I have been successful in the past at identifying which is which....



--------------------
Richard
A forecast is NOT a promise!


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57497479
Weather Master


Reged: Sun
Posts: 414
Loc: W. Central Florida
Re: LOWS... How do you tell the difference?
      #2112 - Wed Aug 21 2002 09:00 PM

Thanks Richard for your reply. Your Explanation was very good and easy to follow. I can visualize what you are saying and I think that it will really help me out. Just don't quiz me on it to soon. Again thanks! Toni

--------------------
TONI


All of us could take a lesson from the weather:
It pays no attention to criticism

My 2003 Hurricane guess 13-9-3


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