Current Radar or Satellite Image

Flhurricane.com - Central Florida Hurricane CenterHurricanes Without the Hype! Since 1995


Nothing currently in the Atlantic Basin, for Late October the West Caribbean is usually where to monitor.
Days since last H. Landfall - US: Any 10 (Nate) , Major: 28 (Maria) Florida - Any: 38 (Irma) Major: 38 (Irma)
None
COMMUNICATION
STORM DATA
CONTENT
FOLLOW US
ADS
Login to remove ads

 


General Discussion >> Hurricane Ask/Tell

Jump to first unread post. Pages: 1
Keith234
Storm Chaser


Reged: Thu
Posts: 921
Loc: 40.7N/73.3W Long Island
Convective Bursts
      #25541 - Sat Sep 11 2004 09:12 PM

This question has be posted in another fourm, I thought it might fit here better. What causes convective bursts at night in hurricanes?

--------------------
"I became insane with horrible periods of sanity"
Edgar Allan Poe


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
LI Phil
User


Reged: Fri
Posts: 2637
Loc: Long Island (40.7N 73.6W)
Re: Convective Bursts [Re: Keith234]
      #25697 - Sun Sep 12 2004 12:35 AM

avatars from jaws

--------------------
2005 Forecast: 14/7/4

BUCKLE UP!

"If your topic ain't tropic, your post will be toast"


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Keith234
Storm Chaser


Reged: Thu
Posts: 921
Loc: 40.7N/73.3W Long Island
Re: Convective Bursts [Re: LI Phil]
      #25772 - Sun Sep 12 2004 08:30 AM

I got tried of looking at the same avatar, I guess this one isn't working either. Thanks for telling me!!

--------------------
"I became insane with horrible periods of sanity"
Edgar Allan Poe


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
ClarkModerator
Meteorologist


Reged: Wed
Posts: 1710
Loc: 45.95N 84.55W
Re: Convective Bursts [Re: Keith234]
      #26264 - Mon Sep 13 2004 01:14 AM

There is a phenomenon called the diurnal convective cycle, leading to nighttime being more favorable for convection in storms.

I was unable to find a definitive answer to what exactly it is, so the following is my own hypothesis from what I did find and what I've learned about tropical meteorology through the years...so perhaps take it with a grain of salt.

At night, you have less solar radiation (insolation) reaching the top of the atmosphere from the sun...well, to tell the truth, no solar radiation reaching the top of the atmosphere from the sun. This results in a cooler atmosphere as a whole. While the temperatures in the upper troposphere are always cold to begin with, when there is less insolation, the overall temperatures are going to be colder. Thus, you see a minimum in the mid-to-late afternoon, when the amount of insolation through the day is at its peak (around the time you see the daily high temperature at the surface), whereas you see a maximum in the overnight hours when the atmosphere has had time to sufficiently cool (around the time you see the daily low temperature at the surface).

If someone can provide a better or more correct/applicable explanation for the topic though, I'm all ears.

--------------------
Current Tropical Model Output Plots
(or view them on the main page for any active Atlantic storms!)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Keith234
Storm Chaser


Reged: Thu
Posts: 921
Loc: 40.7N/73.3W Long Island
Re: Convective Bursts [Re: Clark]
      #26456 - Mon Sep 13 2004 02:49 PM

That would make sense, the earth takes time to cool off. Thanks for the anwser Clark.

--------------------
"I became insane with horrible periods of sanity"
Edgar Allan Poe


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Pages: 1



Extra information
0 registered and 11 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:  CFHC, Ed Dunham, Colleen A., danielw, Clark, RedingtonBeachGuy, Bloodstar, tpratch, typhoon_tip, cieldumort 

Print Topic

Forum Permissions
      You cannot start new topics
      You cannot reply to topics
      HTML is disabled
      UBBCode is enabled

Rating:
Topic views: 5820

Rate this topic

Jump to

Note: This is NOT an official page. It is run by weather hobbyists and should not be used as a replacement for official sources. 
CFHC's main servers are currently located at
Hostdime.com in Orlando, FL.
Image Server Network thanks to Mike Potts and Amazon Web Services. If you have static file hosting space that allows dns aliasing contact us to help out! Some Maps Provided by:
Great thanks to all who donated and everyone who uses the site as well. Site designed for 800x600+ resolution
When in doubt, take the word of the National Hurricane Center