MikeCAdministrator
(Admin)
Thu Nov 30 2006 06:38 AM
Quietest Season Since 1997

Today is the last day of the 2006 Hurricane season, no land falling Hurricanes in the US this year at all (Ernesto came very close in North Carolina, however). And almost anything that got started fell apart just as quickly, Chris and Ernesto being the two biggest potential threats. Chris fell apart, and Ernesto never regained strength after crossing Cuba.

Three Tropical Storms made landfall in the US, Alberto making landfall in the Big Bend of Florida, Beryl (Clipping Cape Cod) and making landfall in Nova Scotia, and Ernesto, which crossed through the center of Florida as a very weak tropical storm, and restrengthend close to hurricane strength when it reached North Carolina.



The last tracked system was Isaac, which left us at the start of October. Most systems were fish spinners this year, and only 9 named storms the entire season, quite a contrast to last year. El Nino and dryer/dustier air inhibited a lot of development this year, but it was still closer to a "normal" season than the last two years, which were in a league of their own.

I wish all years were more like this.

Farewell to the quiet 2006 season. The 2007 season starts June 1st, 2007. Next year probably will be a bit more of an average season, but nothing like 2005. This

Thanks to all that helped out this year, it allowed us to stay up again, and be ready for the next season. More improvements are planned for next year, including another site redesign for 2007.



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