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General Discussion >> Hurricane Ask/Tell

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DustDuchess
Weather Watcher


Reged: Sun
Posts: 28
Loc: Polk County Florida
Question about definition of Word "Bomb"
      #14908 - Fri Jun 04 2004 08:27 PM

I see the word "bomb" used a lot by the weather posters. Does this mean that the weather intensified. When some one uses the word to say the forecast bombed does that mean it was accurate or that it did not verify.Please explain exactly what people are talking about. Are they using the term correctly or are they making up slang as they go. This would help when reading the posts. Thanks

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Good or bad, weather is all there is.


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Ed DunhamAdministrator
Former Meteorologist & CFHC Forum Moderator (Ed Passed Away on May 14, 2017)


Reged: Sun
Posts: 2565
Loc: Melbourne, FL
Re: Question about definition of Word "Bomb"
      #14913 - Fri Jun 04 2004 08:52 PM

Well let me try to blast away at this one. When a forecast 'bombs' that means that it was a lousy forecast that did not even come close to verifying. When a cyclone 'bombs' that means that it intensified significantly over a short period of time - anything from 6 to 24 hours. The term first came into common useage up in the northeast U.S. and originally described a winter storm, i.e., a nor'easter - which was a gale center that rapidly intensified and created blizzard conditions over a large portion of the northeast - blinding snow driven by high winds that resulted from the rapid intensification of the system. So an otherwise normal run of the mill coastal storm that suddenly and rapidly intensifies is called a storm that 'bombed'.
Cheers,
ED


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DustDuchess
Weather Watcher


Reged: Sun
Posts: 28
Loc: Polk County Florida
Re: Question about definition of Word "Bomb"
      #14914 - Fri Jun 04 2004 08:56 PM

Thanks. I kind of knew but then would become confused about the way it was being used sometimes. Now at least I will know if I agree or not with the call.

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Good or bad, weather is all there is.


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LI Phil
User


Reged: Fri
Posts: 2637
Loc: Long Island (40.7N 73.6W)
Re: Question about definition of Word "Bomb"
      #14915 - Fri Jun 04 2004 08:56 PM

>>>Well let me try to blast away at this one.

Ed, LOL!

Seriously, I'm as guilty as anyone for using this term, mostly because Steve & Joe B throw it around. But thanks for the info about it's origins..nor'easters. I get my fair share of those and yeah, just watch that storm currently affecting the area just south of me. If it gets out over the (relatively) warm waters (probably too far north now), it will "bomb" out and rapidly intensify.

Unless, of course, Joe B's forecast "bombs".

Cheers & Peace,

LI Phil

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2005 Forecast: 14/7/4

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