Current Radar or Satellite Image

Flhurricane.com - Central Florida Hurricane CenterHurricanes Without the Hype! Since 1995


Azores #96L fails to complete transition into a Sub-Tropical Storm. Elsewhere, weak low pressure in Caribbean may linger into next week.
Days since last H. Landfall - US: Any 44 (Nate) , Major: 62 (Maria) Florida - Any: 72 (Irma) Major: 72 (Irma)
None
COMMUNICATION
STORM DATA
CONTENT
FOLLOW US
ADS
Login to remove ads

 


General Discussion >> Hurricane Ask/Tell

Jump to first unread post. Pages: 1
robere
Unregistered




terminology
      #53504 - Fri Sep 02 2005 10:31 AM

can someone please explain to me the use of the terms "invest", and the assignment of the numericals "92", "97", etc.?

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
ClarkModerator
Meteorologist


Reged: Wed
Posts: 1710
Loc: 45.95N 84.55W
Re: terminology [Re: robere]
      #53581 - Fri Sep 02 2005 05:03 PM

Invest means they are investigating it for possible development. The numbers 90-99 (recycled after 99 back to 90) are assigned so as not to conflict with any actual system that may be out there while still keeping them in the two-digit realm (good for model runs and such). The letter after the number designates which basin the invest is in -- L is for Atlantic, E is for the East Pacific, W is for the West Pacific, and S is for the Southern Pacific. There's one for the Indian Ocean too, but I don't think it is I.

--------------------
Current Tropical Model Output Plots
(or view them on the main page for any active Atlantic storms!)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
robere
Unregistered




Re: terminology [Re: Clark]
      #53597 - Fri Sep 02 2005 06:31 PM

mr clark, i appreciate your response. the recycling of the numbers was most confusing.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
SkeetoBiteAdministrator
Master of Maps


Reged: Sun
Posts: 298
Loc: Lakeland, FL
Re: terminology [Re: robere]
      #53600 - Fri Sep 02 2005 06:40 PM

Quote:

mr clark, i appreciate your response. the recycling of the numbers was most confusing.




Indeed they are. Try programming around them!

mr. clark, you're my hero! heheh. -HF

Edited by HanKFranK (Sun Sep 04 2005 12:51 AM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Random Chaos
Weather Analyst


Reged: Sat
Posts: 1023
Loc: Maryland 38.98N 76.50W
Re: terminology [Re: Clark]
      #53931 - Tue Sep 06 2005 07:03 PM

Indian Ocean is B on NRL
Indian Ocean is S on SSD



There are also Central Pacific, Bay of Bengal, and Arabian Sea storms, but I'm not sure even if they have letters. I'll have to wait until we get a system listed to see how it's numbered.

---------

Also, I'm not positive 90 is the break point. I think I've seen an 89L before...and this last time they skipped 90L and 91L.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
ClarkModerator
Meteorologist


Reged: Wed
Posts: 1710
Loc: 45.95N 84.55W
Re: terminology [Re: Random Chaos]
      #53960 - Tue Sep 06 2005 11:04 PM

Ah, that's how it goes -- thanks Random Chaos! The B is for the Northern Hemisphere storms, while the S is for those in the Southern Hemisphere to avoid confusion. I believe the S includes all storms in both the Southern Indian & Pacific Oceans as there is generally less activity in that hemisphere and only the two related basins where you really see tropical activity down there.

There has been an 89L, but that was a test product and not an actual storm or invest. They didn't skip 90L or 91L this time around -- they just weren't out there for very long. Trying to keep up with the overall terminology for the current cycle: 95L became Irene (I believe), 96L dissipated in the central Atlantic, 97L also dissipated in the central Atlantic, 98L became Jose, 99L became Katrina, 90L dissipated in the central Atlantic, 91L became Maria, 92L dissipated (yes, in the central Atlantic...notice a theme? ), 93L became Nate, and 94L became TD 16/Ophelia. Whew.

--------------------
Current Tropical Model Output Plots
(or view them on the main page for any active Atlantic storms!)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
robere
Unregistered




Re: terminology [Re: Clark]
      #54010 - Wed Sep 07 2005 10:35 AM

thanks again clark, i feel slightly less unintelligent. and i'm somewhat comforted that Skeetobite is slightly confused as well! (thanks for your maps)
is the "they" who first determine an "invest" rating, and who later assign a numerical, the NWS? but that would not cover all global would it?
i believe it was the NWS who decided to give a new number to what eventually became Katrina, is that correct? the explanation given at that time seemed rational, at least to a relatively superficial observer such as myself.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Random Chaos
Weather Analyst


Reged: Sat
Posts: 1023
Loc: Maryland 38.98N 76.50W
Re: terminology [Re: Clark]
      #54045 - Wed Sep 07 2005 12:11 PM

Quote:

The B is for the Northern Hemisphere storms, while the S is for those in the Southern Hemisphere to avoid confusion.




Ah!

Hmm. NRL and SSD were reporting different systems. Makes sense now - 93B in "Indian Ocean" at NRL, and 95S in "South Indian Ocean" at SSD.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
ClarkModerator
Meteorologist


Reged: Wed
Posts: 1710
Loc: 45.95N 84.55W
Re: terminology [Re: robere]
      #54125 - Wed Sep 07 2005 06:59 PM

The various centers coordinate on setting up the invests; I'm not sure it's any one group that assigns them, but it's the Navy's website that shows them most prominently. The NHC has the final say on actually classifying a tropical cyclone in the Atlantic and E. Pacific. In the NW Pacific, it's the JTWC. The JTWC does their own advisories for the other basins that way (incl. the Indian Ocean) as well, though there are other agencies (e.g. Australia's Bureau of Meteorology) that issue their own advisories as well.

Just a note to add that the CPHC (Honolulu) has these same responsibilities for the Central Pacific basin.

Edited by Ed Dunham (Wed Sep 07 2005 07:42 PM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Pages: 1



Extra information
0 registered and 13 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:  CFHC, Ed Dunham, Colleen A., danielw, Clark, RedingtonBeachGuy, Bloodstar, tpratch, typhoon_tip, cieldumort 

Print Topic

Forum Permissions
      You cannot start new topics
      You cannot reply to topics
      HTML is disabled
      UBBCode is enabled

Rating:
Topic views: 6072

Rate this topic

Jump to

Note: This is NOT an official page. It is run by weather hobbyists and should not be used as a replacement for official sources. 
CFHC's main servers are currently located at
Hostdime.com in Orlando, FL.
Image Server Network thanks to Mike Potts and Amazon Web Services. If you have static file hosting space that allows dns aliasing contact us to help out! Some Maps Provided by:
Great thanks to all who donated and everyone who uses the site as well. Site designed for 800x600+ resolution
When in doubt, take the word of the National Hurricane Center