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Azores #96L fails to complete transition into a Sub-Tropical Storm. Elsewhere, weak low pressure in Caribbean may linger into next week.
Days since last H. Landfall - US: Any 45 (Nate) , Major: 63 (Maria) Florida - Any: 73 (Irma) Major: 73 (Irma)
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General Discussion >> Hurricane Ask/Tell

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Myles
Weather Hobbyist


Reged: Wed
Posts: 80
Loc: SW FL
What is this?
      #73612 - Sun Sep 10 2006 10:08 PM Attachment (397 downloads)

I'm seeing a strange feature in the Atlantic tonite as I'm watching Flo. It just popped out of nowhere on the northeast side of the ridge Flo is curving around. You can see it real good on the wv loop here (time sensitive). I also attatched a pic so you can see excactly what I'm talking about. It's something I dont think I've ever seen before and I was wondering if anyone knew what is was?

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ClarkModerator
Meteorologist


Reged: Wed
Posts: 1710
Loc: 45.95N 84.55W
Re: What is this? [Re: Myles]
      #73614 - Sun Sep 10 2006 10:15 PM

There's some sort of boundary/wave associated with that feature. My guess is that given where it is located, not too far from the edge of a jet entrance region, it could be an isolated gravity wave event. There appears to be a weaker impulse just behind it, particularly evident on the southern flank of that initial wave.

It's more interesting to watch than anything. Gravity waves come with perturbations in the flow fields, meaning that this event could be perturbing the flow just enough to bring some moisture into the viewable range of the water vapor sensor. That all is my educated guess, however, and not definitive.

--------------------
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Myles
Weather Hobbyist


Reged: Wed
Posts: 80
Loc: SW FL
Re: What is this? [Re: Clark]
      #73617 - Sun Sep 10 2006 10:37 PM

Wow! That was quick, Clark. Thanks for the explantion. I saw the weaker impluce behind it and it just made me question it more. I tried to read up on gravity waves but I think they're way over my head for my understanding of meteorology. I guess it's best just to know they distrupt the flow in the atmosphere and not try to go too much deeper.

So to sum it up you believe this is some kind of gravity wave which is causing a slight change in the moisture/IR temp(you can just make it out on IR, too. Prob be very interesting if it was still daytime), but it's not really causing much change in weather?

Yep, pretty much. It may last for some time through the night, but is more of just an interesting phenomenon. -Clark

Edited by Clark (Sun Sep 10 2006 11:00 PM)


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danielwAdministrator
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Reged: Wed
Posts: 3502
Loc: Hattiesburg,MS (31.3N 89.3W)
Re: What is this? [Re: Myles]
      #73619 - Sun Sep 10 2006 10:48 PM

Clark posted an excellant explanation.

I checked the latest, 00Z, maps. Both surface and 500mb. And couldn't find any map or discussion with a feature in that area.
Some of the OPC's maps are showing a Low to the NE of that area with a stationary front back to the west.
It could be between the SFC and 500 mb level and just isn't being reflected on the maps.

I'll look some more. Out of curiosity.


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