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Alberto moving rapdily North west of Florida, slightly stronger with 45MPH winds. Landfall in the panhandle midday tomorrow likely.
Days since last H. Landfall - US: Any 231 (Nate) , Major: 249 (Maria) Florida - Any: 259 (Irma) Major: 259 (Irma)
27.1N 84.4W
Wind: 50MPH
Pres: 994mb
Moving:
N at 14 mph
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General Discussion >> Hurricane History

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neospaceblue
Weather Watcher


Reged: Thu
Posts: 28
Loc: Newport News, VA
My list of Possible Category Five hurricanes
      #77478 - Fri Aug 24 2007 08:20 PM

Here is my list of storms that I think may have reached Category Five at peak intensity.

Before 1928

Great Hurricane of 1780 ( 1780 )
1856 Last Island Hurricane ( 1856 )
Indianola Hurricane of 1886 ( 1886 )
1893 Cheniere Caminada Hurricane ( 1893 )
Hurricane San Ciriaco ( 1899 )
Galveston Hurricane ( 1900 )

After 1928

Hurricane Fox ( 1952 )
Hurricane Hazel ( 1954 )
Hurricane Cleo ( 1964 )
Hurricane Betsy ( 1965 )
Hurricane Georges ( 1998 )
Hurricane Floyd ( 1999 )
Hurricane Lenny ( 1999 )
Hurricane Dennis ( 2005 )

( Post would have been more meaningful if you had added your rationale for the intensity upgrades.)

Edited by Ed Dunham (Sat Aug 25 2007 12:41 PM)


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dem05
User


Reged: Wed
Posts: 368
Loc: Port Charlotte, FL
Re: My list of Possible Category Five hurricanes [Re: neospaceblue]
      #77488 - Sat Aug 25 2007 01:59 PM

That is a pretty ambitious list! I don't know about all of those, but if memory serves me correctly, there has been research into the 1926 and the 1928 hurricanes as possible Category 5 hurricanes at landfall. I did not see them on your list. That said...Nothing substantial enough to call them Category 5 Hurricanes has been presented at this time. As far as more recent storms, I would dismiss Lenny and Dennis from the list for sure. And in the Recon era, I would also dismiss Georges from the list. All of these hurricanes were very severe none the less. I image that history will remain unchanged for all of these storms.

Edited by dem05 (Sat Aug 25 2007 02:01 PM)


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Lysis
User


Reged: Thu
Posts: 451
Loc: Hong Kong
Re: My list of Possible Category Five hurricanes [Re: dem05]
      #77494 - Sat Aug 25 2007 09:08 PM

My father went through Betsy in 65'; we actually have 8mm film of the storm!

The NHC reports for storms of this antiquity are pretty thorough, and can be found here:

Archive

The database dates back to 1958, and offers a virtual treasure chest of information for history buffs such as myself.

Back to Betsy, a category 5 recertification would not be totally implausible; its 941mb central pressure would be suspect though. However, considering that Betsy was no where near its peak strength at either landfall, there is really no precedence for such an upgrade.

Hurricane history and climatology is a really great thing to get into, and I would encourage you to foster your interests in this regard.

--------------------
cheers


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LisaC
Weather Watcher


Reged: Wed
Posts: 39
Re: My list of Possible Category Five hurricanes [Re: neospaceblue]
      #77520 - Mon Aug 27 2007 10:20 AM

Missing is Hurricane Andrew.

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CaneTrackerInSoFl
Storm Tracker


Reged: Mon
Posts: 395
Loc: 25.63N 80.33W
Re: My list of Possible Category Five hurricanes [Re: LisaC]
      #77524 - Mon Aug 27 2007 08:27 PM

Hurricane Andrew was already given the official upgrade.

--------------------
Andrew 1992, Irene 1999, Katrina 2005, Wilma 2005



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neospaceblue
Weather Watcher


Reged: Thu
Posts: 28
Loc: Newport News, VA
Re: My list of Possible Category Five hurricanes [Re: neospaceblue]
      #85602 - Wed Jun 10 2009 09:36 AM

I realize that it has been two years since I first made this post, but since then I have become a more experienced hurricane tracker and looking back at some of my estimates, I have removed some storms, and added others.

Indianola (1886) - I believe that the Indianola storm hit 140kts before striking Texas, taking into account that it was still intensifying when it reached the coast.
Sea Islands (1893) - HURDAT lists it as maintaining 105kts for about 4-5 days. It likely got up to a Category 5 sometime during this time period.
Florida Keys (1919) - Had a similar track to Hurricane Rita. Taking into consideration that the storm was 130kts in the keys, and still had not moved into the Gulf, it probably reached at least 145kts at peak intensity, and maybe as high as 155kts if it crossed the loop current.
Hazel (1954) - Probably a Category 5 in the southern Carribbean.

--------------------
I survived: Hurricane Bonnie (1998), Hurricane Dennis (1999), Hurricane Floyd (1999), Hurricane Isabel (2003), Tropical Storm Ernesto (2006)


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