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Sam now a hurricane and strengthening, however it is likely to remain out to sea, but worth watching next week.
Days since last H. Landfall - US: Any 10 (Nicholas) , Major: 25 (Ida) Florida - Any: 1079 (Michael) Major: 1079 (Michael)
11.5N 42.2W
Wind: 75MPH
Pres: 993mb
Moving:
W at 15 mph
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#1014206 (Received by flhurricane at: 11:06 AM 27.Aug.2020)
TCPAT3

BULLETIN
Hurricane Laura Advisory Number 31
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL AL132020
1000 AM CDT Thu Aug 27 2020

...DAMAGING WINDS AND FLOODING RAINFALL SPREADING INLAND OVER
CENTRAL AND NORTHERN PORTIONS OF LOUISIANA...
...HIGH WATER LEVELS PERSIST ALONG PORTIONS OF THE GULF COAST...


SUMMARY OF 1000 AM CDT...1500 UTC...INFORMATION
-----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...31.9N 93.1W
ABOUT 55 MI...90 KM NW OF ALEXANDRIA LOUISIANA
ABOUT 55 MI...85 KM SE OF SHREVEPORT LOUISIANA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...75 MPH...120 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...N OR 5 DEGREES AT 16 MPH...26 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...982 MB...29.00 INCHES


WATCHES AND WARNINGS
--------------------
CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY:

The Storm Surge Warning has been discontinued west of Sabine Pass,
Texas and east of Port Fourchon, Louisiana.

SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT:

A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for...
* Sabine Pass Texas to Port Fourchon Louisiana

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for...
* High Island Texas to the Mouth of the Mississippi River

A Storm Surge Warning means there is a danger of life-threatening
inundation, from rising water moving inland from the coastline in
the indicated locations. For a depiction of areas at risk, please
see the National Weather Service Storm Surge Watch/Warning Graphic,
available at hurricanes.gov.

A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are
expected somewhere within the warning area.

For storm information specific to your area, including possible
inland watches and warnings, please monitor products issued by your
local National Weather Service forecast office.


DISCUSSION AND OUTLOOK
----------------------
At 1000 AM CDT (1500 UTC), the center of Hurricane Laura was located
inland over northwestern Louisiana near latitude 31.9 North,
longitude 93.1 West. Laura is moving toward the north near 16 mph
(26 km/h) and this motion should continue through today. A
northeastward to east-northeastward motion is expected tonight and
Friday. On the forecast track, Laura will move northward across
northern Louisiana this afternoon. The center of Laura is forecast
to move over Arkansas tonight, the mid-Mississippi Valley on Friday,
and the mid-Atlantic states on Saturday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 75 mph (120 km/h) with higher
gusts. Rapid weakening is forecast, and Laura is expected to
become a tropical storm withing the next few hours, and weaken
to a tropical depression tonight.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 35 miles (55 km) from the
center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 105 miles
(165 km).

The estimated minimum central pressure based on surface
observations is 982 mb (29.00 inches).


HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
----------------------
Key messages for Laura can be found in the Tropical Cyclone
Discussion under AWIPS header MIATCDAT3 and WMO header WTNT43 KNHC.

STORM SURGE: Water levels remain elevated along the Gulf Coast
and will continue to subside over the next few hours.

WIND: Damaging wind gusts and tropical storm conditions are
expected to spread into portions of northern Louisiana and Arkansas
through this evening.

RAINFALL: Through Friday Laura is expected to produce additional
rainfall totals of 4 to 8 inches across portions of Louisiana,
Mississippi and Arkansas, with isolated storm totals of 18 inches
over Louisiana.

This rainfall will continue to cause widespread flash and urban
flooding, small streams and creeks to overflow their banks, and
minor to moderate freshwater river flooding.

Through Saturday, Laura is expected to produce 1 to 3 inches with
isolated maximum amounts of 5 inches across the mid-Mississippi
Valley, portions of the Tennessee and Lower Ohio Valleys, the
central Appalachians, and the Mid-Atlantic States.

This rainfall may lead to flash and urban flooding and rapid rises
on small streams.

TORNADOES: Tornadoes are possible through tonight over parts of
Louisiana, Arkansas, and western Mississippi. The risk for tornadoes
will shift into the Mid-South and Tennessee Valley regions on Friday
into Friday night.

SURF: Swells produced by Laura continue to affect the U.S. Gulf
coast from the Florida Panhandle to Texas and northeastern Mexico.
These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip
current conditions. Please consult products from your local
weather office.


NEXT ADVISORY
-------------
Next intermediate advisory at 100 PM CDT.
Next complete advisory at 400 PM CDT.

$$
Forecaster Brown