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Off-Topic >> Everything and Nothing

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curious
Unregistered




NHC site?
      #67930 - Tue Jul 11 2006 03:47 PM

can someone please tell me or direct me to a site that shows the sea level of Tampa Bay? i was told it is below sea level. Thank You in advance, Curious

parts of the tampa metro area are low enough to be impacted by surge. it isn't in a fishbowl like new orleans, though. whoever told you that has the wrong idea. -HF

Edited by HanKFranK (Tue Jul 11 2006 05:06 PM)


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Margie
Senior Storm Chaser


Reged: Fri
Posts: 1191
Loc: Twin Cities
Re: NHC site? [Re: curious]
      #67932 - Tue Jul 11 2006 04:01 PM

Quote:

can someone please tell me or direct me to a site that shows the sea level of Tampa Bay? i was told it is below sea level. Thank You in advance, Curious




Topozone.com shows elevation information for the US.

--------------------
Katrina's Surge: http://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/Katrinas_surge_contents.asp


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Fletch
Weather Guru


Reged: Mon
Posts: 121
Loc: Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Re: NHC site? [Re: curious]
      #67933 - Tue Jul 11 2006 04:38 PM

The city of Tampa is approx 50ft above sea level.

--------------------
Irwin M. Fletcher


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elvinp
Registered User


Reged: Sat
Posts: 2
Loc: Tampa, FL
Re: NHC site? [Re: Fletch]
      #67935 - Tue Jul 11 2006 05:20 PM

Having lived in Tampa for 50 plus years, I can tell you that 50 feet above sea level is only found in the northernmost parts of Tampa near the University of South Florida. The vast majority of Tampa is in the 4-18 foot range. The majority of the City Business District is in the Level 2-3 Evac area. We also have miles of houses next to the bays and the Hillsborough river. There are no houses below sea level, but we have numerous areas where 5-8 inches of rain will cause fresh water flooding.

--------------------
ELVIN


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ShanaTX
Storm Tracker


Reged: Mon
Posts: 226
Loc: Texas
Re: NHC site? [Re: curious]
      #67943 - Tue Jul 11 2006 07:57 PM

Quote:

can someone please tell me or direct me to a site that shows the sea level of Tampa Bay? i was told it is below sea level. Thank You in advance, Curious






Technically, wouldn't *all* of Tampa Bay be *at* sea level? Tampa FL on the other hand....

Anyway ... here's hoping we get some rain this weekend from the GOM...


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