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A few swirls trying to earn an Invest tag in the final days of the 2021 Season. Their environment is not ideal for development.
Days since last H. Landfall - US: Any 74 (Nicholas) , Major: 90 (Ida) Florida - Any: 1144 (Michael) Major: 1144 (Michael)
 


Archives 2000s >> 2009 News Talkbacks

MikeCAdministrator
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Monitoring 97L in Southwest Caribbean Sea
      Tue Oct 27 2009 08:53 AM

3 November 2009 8AM Update
The area in the Central Atlantic is no longer a concern.

This morning the area in the southwestern Caribbean sea has persisted quite well over the last two days and now has a 30-50% chance of developing. It has been designated invest area 97L.

Because of proximity to land it may not develop much. It is likely to remain relatively stationary for the next few days.

The slow motion makes 97L worth watching for changes over the next few days. However, the most likely scenario is that it will be just a rain event for Central America. But there are early model indications that it could stay offshore and potentially strengthen.



Yet another area worth watching is the Bay of Campeche (Southwestern Gulf of Mexico) for changes over the week. The conditions of the atmosphere around it are not conductive for development, however.

2 November 2009 10AM Update
Watching 96L which may become a subtropical system, there is a 30-50% chance it could form within the next 48 hours. No likely threat to land. Conditions are becoming less favorable for development however.

Original Update
2009 continues to be a high shear environment for the Atlantic. We had a few bits of potential activity last week, but nothing strong enough to make it. The Pacific (East and West) has been very active this year, but it isn't this site's focus.

There is still one month of season left, and a small chance that something could occur, but more than likely it won't. 2009 likely (and thankfully) will go down as a very quiet year for the Tropical Atlantic.

{{StormCarib}}
{{StormLinks|97L|97|11|2009|2|97L}}


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Entire topic
Subject Posted by Posted on
* Monitoring 97L in Southwest Caribbean Sea MikeCAdministrator Tue Oct 27 2009 08:53 AM
. * * SW Caribbean and BOC danielwAdministrator   Tue Nov 03 2009 08:43 PM
. * * Re: Monitoring 97L in Southwest Caribbean Sea tropicswatch   Tue Nov 03 2009 06:38 PM
. * * Area of Invest Now On Fast Track ?? CoconutCandy   Tue Nov 03 2009 05:24 PM
. * * Re: Monitoring 97L in Southwest Caribbean Sea MikeCAdministrator   Tue Nov 03 2009 04:37 PM
. * * Re: Monitoring 97L in Southwest Caribbean Sea cieldumort   Tue Nov 03 2009 04:13 PM
. * * Re: Watching a System in North Central Atlantic, No Threat to Land MikeCAdministrator   Tue Nov 03 2009 03:56 PM
. * * Re: Watching a System in North Central Atlantic, No Threat to Land Hawkeyewx   Tue Nov 03 2009 12:07 PM
. * * Re: Watching a System in North Central Atlantic, No Threat to Land vpbob21   Mon Nov 02 2009 05:58 PM
. * * Re: Quiet Again for the Last week of October LoisCane   Sun Nov 01 2009 01:59 PM

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